Finca la Florida: El Salvador

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Finca la Florida: El Salvador

15.00

This Phoenix exclusive was processed by our coffee director in partnership with award-winning coffee producer Aida Batlle. This is our second purchase from third-generation coffee producer Arturo Meza Hill’s farm Finca la Florida and third through Aida Batlle.

Bourbon coffee grown using organic methods in Santa Ana at 1500-1550 MASL; hand-picked and sorted for ripeness; floated and pulped using a disc pulper; fermented underwater using selected yeast for 36 hours; fully washed; and dried on patios for 10 days in combination of sun and shade.

What we taste: Grapefruit, Orange, Praline

12 ounce valve bag

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From our coffee director:

Fun facts: last year, coffee from la Florida was the first coffee we released that was roasted on our Loring roaster.

I flew down to El Salvador in February/March this year to process this coffee. This time, I managed to not end up in the hospital. I selected a slightly different yeast to use this year. It’s hot in El Salvador — like 90-95 degrees during the daytime, with full sunlight. This means there’s a ton of microbial action and coffee will naturally ferment very quickly if left unattended. I like the benefits of longer maceration times, from more articulate acidity to rounder and more viscous cup structure, so I inoculated the tank with a yeast to control and extend that fermentation. The yeast we used this year is the same one I used for Finca Esperanza. It tends to produce round, bright tropical notes like pineapple, papaya, orange and mango.

Additionally, I asked the pickers to pick slightly less ripe this year (“solamente cereza maduro, sangre roja y borgoña”—only blood red and burgundy ripe cherry) as they traditionally pick purple-ripe in El Salvador which (a) both contributes to an ultrafast fermentation and (b) decreases the overall perception of acids in the cup. Since it’s hot and bright there, fruit tends to ripen quickly and a result we need to do what we can to pump up the sweetness, structure and acidity of the cup so it doesn’t just end up a nutty mess of blandness.

One more thing—I had them dry differently. Typically at JHill, parchment coffee is dried in full sun on patios. It takes just 6-8 days (that’s fast). It’s not exactly elegant or gentle, and there was always UV damage to the coffee. This year, I asked for only two days of sun drying (down to about 16% humidity) and then had the coffee moved to complete shade for the remainder of drying (about 10 more days, for 12 days total), down to 10.5% moisture (they usually just dry to 11%) . This was in an effort to stave off the effects of hot storage in Santa Ana and what we expected to be a long time until the container hit the water en route to the U.S.